First Knowing Native Plants Lecture of 2021 (All New)
This Saturday Jan. 16
Wildflowers in Winter
Presented by Mary Anne Borge

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Winter Lecture Series:
Non-native earthworms and their effects on mid-Atlantic forest soils.
Presented by Katalin Szkavecz, Ph.D.

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Jean Barrell Garden Find Out More
Call for Nominations:
Land Ethics Award
Deadline: January 31, 2021

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
21st Annual Land Ethics Symposium:
Creative Approaches to Ecological Landscaping

Registratrion and More Information
More Info and Registration Here
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December's Seasonal Highlights
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Featured Events

17Jan

Non-native earthworms and their effects on mid-Atlantic forest soils – Jan. 17 – WLS 2021

Sunday, January 17 - 2:00 pm$15.00
Earthworms are ecosystem engineers that influence essentially all physical, chemical and biological soil properties. In the mid-Atlantic region, non-native earthworms of European origin colonized the secondary forests hundreds of years ago. Currently, a ‘second wave’ earthworm invasion is taking place by another group of earthworms, commonly known as “jumping worms.” Szlavecz will present an overview of the history of earthworm invasion, the natural history of native and non-native earthworms and the profound ecological impact invasive earthworms have on the soil ecosystem. Katalin Szkavecz, Ph.D., is a research professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. Her research interest is the soil ecosystem, particularly soil biodiversity, and the role of biota in soil carbon and nitrogen cycling. Her research focuses on human-modified landscapes, such as secondary forests, crop fields and the urban environment. Szlavecz earned her Ph.D. at Eotvos University, Hungary. She is the co-principal investigator of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, a research associate at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, and co-founder of GLUSEEN (Global Urban Soil Ecology and Education Network). At JHU, she teaches courses on global environmental change, general ecology and soil ecology.
24Jan

Getting to the Source of Our Native Plants: Does Provenance Matter? – Jan. 24 – WLS 2021

Sunday, January 24 - 2:00 pm$15.00
As native plants gain popularity in the horticultural trade, there are important issues and challenges that need to be considered. The potential for genetic exchange between cultivated native plants and wild plant populations means that our landscaping decisions have impacts beyond the boundaries of our yards. Does the geographic source of a plant matter as long as it's a native species? Are cultivars of native species equivalent to naturally occurring populations? These topics will be discussed and recommendations given to help native plant enthusiasts make better-informed decisions for the long-term survival of native species. Daniel P. Duran, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Science at Rowan University, as well as the naturalist for Scotland Run Park, a 1300-acre nature preserve at the edge of the New Jersey Pine Barrens. He has published research papers on agricultural entomology, biodiversity, and molecular phylogenetics.  Duran has described 10 new species of insects previously unknown to science. He earned a B.S. in environmental science from Stockton University, an M.S. in entomology from the University of Missouri and a Ph.D. in evolution and ecology from Vanderbilt University. In between his degrees, he has also worked for the Natural History Museum, London, UK and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. Duran is a co-author of the book "A Field Guide to the Tiger Beetles of the United States and Canada, 2nd Edition."
31Jan

How the Geology of Bowman’s Hill Influences Our Environment – Jan. 31 – WLS 2021

Sunday, January 31 - 2:00 pm$15.00
Join local geologist Phil Getty on a virtual tour of the geology in and around Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve. Learn how Bowman Hill’s unique geology was formed and the influence that bedrock has on nature, as well as humans. This lecture will enable you to understand how geology directly controls topography and soils to create the hill’s unique plant, animal and aquatic ecosystems. Phil Getty has consulted as an environmental hydrogeologist in the Bucks County area for 40 years. The professional geologist holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in geology from Pennsylvania State and West Virginia universities. He has served on the boards of the Peace Valley Nature Center and Bucks County Audubon Society, as well as taught at Delaware Valley University. He also has advised land conservation associations, such as the Heritage Conservancy, on natural resources. In addition, Getty has presented numerous geology classes and field trips for naturalists, nature centers and the general public, with the goal of increasing our awareness of the land beneath our feet.
07Feb

The Bird and the Bean: A Coffee Connection – Feb. 7 – WLS 2021

Sunday, February 7 - 2:00 pm$15.00
Every day, we see a variety of certification labels on packages of coffee and other foods: fair trade, organic, non-GMO and more. One certification on the rise is the Smithsonian Institution’s Bird Friendly® designation. Using Smithsonian conservation science, the Bird Friendly gold standard does more than other eco-friendly seals to protect habitat. In this lecture, Santino Lauricella will explore some of the research used in developing this certification, the impacts it has on the planet and how important it is to vote “with your wallet.” Santino Lauricella is a naturalist, photographer, environmental educator and passionate coffee drinker. The education coordinator for Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve is passionate about sharing his knowledge of the natural world with the public. Originally from central New York state, he holds a B.S. in wildlife management from SUNY College of Environmental Science. His career—which began with wildlife research—has taken him across the United States several times. He now lives happily in Lawrenceville, NJ, with his wonderful wife Kathleen and enjoys spending his weekend mornings with a warm cup or two of fresh hand-ground, shade-grown brew.

Featured Events

17Jan

Non-native earthworms and their effects on mid-Atlantic forest soils – Jan. 17 – WLS 2021

Sunday, January 17$15.00
Earthworms are ecosystem engineers that influence essentially all physical, chemical...
24Jan

Getting to the Source of Our Native Plants: Does Provenance Matter? – Jan. 24 – WLS 2021

Sunday, January 24$15.00
As native plants gain popularity in the horticultural trade, there...
31Jan

How the Geology of Bowman’s Hill Influences Our Environment – Jan. 31 – WLS 2021

Sunday, January 31$15.00
Join local geologist Phil Getty on a virtual tour of...